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Know Your Youth Labor Laws

By August 9, 2022August 30th, 2022Employment Law

Young Worker in a CoffeeshopYounger workers – those under the age of 18 – can be a great source of workplace talent for employers. They’re energetic, creative and, for the most part, flexible if you can work around their academic and extracurricular commitments.

If you’re thinking of hiring youth labor for your business, you’ll need to be mindful that most states have their own rules about employing young workers. In addition, some states have different minimum wage requirements. When federal and state regulations differ, the rules that provide the most protection apply.

Here’s a brief overview of some key rules in the states in which MarathonHR has clients.

StateEmployment CertificateAge CertificationMaximum daily/weekly hours (When school is in session)Maximum daily/weekly hours (When school is not in session)
AlabamaUnder 18Not Required3 hr/day; 18 hr/week40 hr/week; 6 days/week
FloridaNot requiredUnder 183 when followed by school day, except if enrolled in vocational program; 15 hr/week8 hr/day; 40 hr/week; 6 days/week
GeorgiaUnder 16Not required3 hr/day; 18 hr/week8 hr/day; 40 hr/week; 6 days/week
North CarolinaUnder 18Not requiredStudents of 14 and 15 enrolled in approved Work Experience and Career Exploration programs may work during school hours up to 3 hours on a school day and 23 hours in a school week
South CarolinaNot requiredNot required3 hr/day; 18 hr/week8 hr/day; 40 hr/week; 6 days/week
TennesseeNot requiredNot required3 hr/day; 18 hr/week8 hr/day; 40 hr/week; 6 days/week
VirginiaUnder 16Under 163 hr/day; 18 hr/week8 hr/day; 40 hr/week; 6 days/week

There are also restrictions on the number of nighttime hours that youth can work, especially before school days.

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