Skip to main content

When Employees Quit Unexpectedly, Do You Know Why?

Per a recent article in the Harvard Business Review, more employees are voluntarily leaving their jobs than at almost any other time this millennium. When an employee quits – especially if the individual was a valued contributor – or the person “ghosts” the firm (stops showing up with no notice), employers can feel confused and betrayed. If the organization has invested resources in the employee, such as training, the loss can be financial, as well.

Although emotional responses may be unpreventable, they aren’t very productive. Rather than focus on why an employee left unexpectedly, such events should present a learning opportunity.  (Don’t rely on the “exit interview,” if you conduct one, to provide much insight. Even when exit interviews take place, research suggests that a large percentage of employees are not candid.)

The Harvard Business Review article referenced above provides a host of inspiration and insights to help HR pros and business leaders turn unexpected employee departures into an opportunity for improvement. The Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) gained permission to reprint the article in its entirety, and we’re sharing that link, here. Whether you are a SHRM member or a visitor to the site, you should be able to view it.

As summer draws to a close, and we prepare for our “second New Year” (Labor Day), this article presents a great read that should inspire you.