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OSHA Regulations

What Happens When a Remote Worker is Injured at Home?

By Employment Law, OSHA Regulations, Workplace Injuries

With many companies either hiring remote employees or allowing existing employees to work from home, the process of documenting workplace injuries is becoming more complicated. An article I read recently described a situation in which a salesperson tripped over her dog and fractured her wrist while working from home for a major retailer. She filed – and won – a lawsuit against the employer, claiming the injury resulted from her employment and the company’s requirement…

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What Guidelines Does OSHA Offer on Mask Use?

By Best Practices, COVID-19, OSHA Regulations

A client approached me recently about updating their company’s employee handbook to include COVID prevention policies. Specifically, we looked at whether or not OSHA has requirements on mask usage in the workplace. OSHA does not have a specific mask policy that applies to all businesses. However, here are some principles that businesses should keep in mind when creating their workplace policies. Safety first In the context of COVID, OSHA says that its guidance is advisory…

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Vaccine Mandate Looms for Employers

By COVID-19, Employment Law, Employment News, OSHA Regulations, Vaccine Mandates

Under the federal vaccine mandate announced by the Biden administration, many large employers will be required to have their workers vaccinated or subject to weekly COVID-19 testing. The current deadline for compliance is January 4, but the situation is a moving target. On Saturday, November 6, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 5th Circuit halted the requirements pending their review. Republican attorneys general in at least 26 states have challenged President Biden’s vaccine and…

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How can an employer be prepared for accident reporting?

By Employment Law, Employment News, OSHA Regulations, Risk Management & Safety

Each February 1 through April 30, employers are required to display OSHA Form 300A, which is a summary of the injuries and illnesses recorded the previous year. If there are multiple locations, a business is required to complete a Form 300 and 300A for each physical establishment. Form 300A should be posted in a visible location where employees can view accident totals for their specific workplace site. Both Form 300 and Form 301 must be…

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When Accidents Happen, Proper Documentation is a Must

By OSHA Regulations

It’s a fact of life – accidents happen. While it’s impossible to predict or anticipate accidents in the workplace, one thing that employers can prepare for is recordkeeping and reporting. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requires most employers with 10 or more employees to keep detailed records of serious work-related injuries and illnesses. What must an employer do when an accident happens? OSHA requires that injurious accidents are recorded on a Log of…

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Help Your Employees Avoid Heat Related Illness

By OSHA Regulations

While the daily high temperatures on May 31 were below normal in most parts of the country this year, it was nonetheless recognized as the National Heat Awareness Day and for good measure. As Memorial Day Weekend is celebrated as the official start of summer for many, it also represents a time where there is an increased risk for workers who routinely perform their duties outdoors. Best practices for protecting your workers from heat related…

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Employers are Required to Post Form 300A Regardless of Whether They Had Workplace Injuries in 2020

By OSHA Regulations, Workplace Injuries

Employers with more than 10 employees are required to post OSHA Form 300A, which lists a summary of the total number of job-related injuries and illnesses that occurred during the prior year and were logged with OSHA via Form 300, the Log of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses. Employers who reported no injuries or illnesses in 2020 may simply enter “zero” on the total line on Form 300A. The form must be signed and certified by a…

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Battling Flu Season

By Best Practices, OSHA Regulations

Flu season is getting started here in the South, and now is a great time to get your office and your workers ready to battle it. According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), every flu season sickens millions of Americans, hospitalizes hundreds of thousands, and kills tens of thousands. The 2017-2018 flu season was the most severe in a decade. While only moderate in severity, the 2018-2019 season was record-breaking in duration, with flu…

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Compliance Tips for 2019

By Best Practices, Employment Law, OSHA Regulations, Policies and Procedures

As we head toward the new year, following are some considerations for compliance in various areas. Staying on top of these will help keep your firm out of trouble while minimizing expenses and payroll. Payroll compliance is often more about correct interpretation of the law than math. If you are having trouble discerning between employees and independent contractors, look to the IRS guidelines for direction. Some—but not all—employee discounts qualify as income. Learn the difference. Even…

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Flu Season Is Around the Corner. Are You Prepared?

By Best Practices, OSHA Regulations, Policies and Procedures, Risk Management & Safety, Sick Leave

Although flu season doesn’t really get started until late October, especially in the South, now is a great time to get your office and your workers ready to battle it. Last year’s flu season was especially dangerous—and deadly. Flu sent more than over 700,000 people to the hospital, and 180 children died. The 2017-2018 season was driven by a flu strain, the H3N2 virus, which tends to result in more hospitalizations and cause more deaths….

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