Skip to main content
Category

Employment Law

Expansion of COBRA Requires Updated Notices

By Employment Law

With the expansion of COBRA eligibility under ARPA comes a requirement for updated information to be posted in your office along with all other mandatory notices as well and distributed to all individuals who may no longer be in your employment but are eligible for the benefit and subsidy. While the provision went into effect on April 1, the legislation allows federal agencies 30-45 days to provide model notices. Rest assured that once notices are…

Read More

ARPA Provides 100% Employer Credit, Expands COBRA Enrollment Rights

By Employment Law, Employment News

Beginning April 1, 2021 and continuing through September 30, 2021, group health plans providing COBRA continuation coverage are required to offer a 100% subsidy of COBRA premiums for individuals eligible for COBRA due to involuntary termination or reduction in hours. The premium subsidy is advanced by the employer and is not taxable to the former employee. Employers will be reimbursed via a refundable credit against their Medicare payroll tax liability. Individuals without a COBRA election…

Read More

When Do School Closures Qualify for EFLMEA

By Employment Law, FMLA

With another round of school closures prominent in local media, employees who are not able to work from home may be turning to their employers to inquire about their eligibility for paid leave. As we mentioned in an earlier article, requirements outlined in the Emergency Family Medical Leave Expansion Act (EFMLEA) expired December 31 with FCCRA but for employers who voluntarily offer benefits through March 31, there is still a tax deduction available. Why you…

Read More

How the Consolidated Appropriations Act Changed EPSL and EFLMA for 2021

By Employment Law, FMLA, Sick Leave

Although most of the benefits associated with Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) passed last March expired on December 31, 2020, many of the COVID-19 related issues it was created to address still exist. Employers should note that when the Consolidated Appropriations Act (CAA) was passed on December 27, 2020, it did not extend the employers’ obligation to provide employees with emergency paid sick leave or emergency family and medical leave, but it did extend…

Read More

Protect Your Business from HR Pitfalls with Our Checklist for 2021

By Best Practices, Employment Law, Hiring, Policies and Procedures, Record-keeping, Recordkeeping

A smart way to start the fiscal year is to incorporate a self-evaluation of your organization’s compliance with state and federal labor laws. This simple checklist should serve as a great starting point. A few basic areas of exploration should include: For Current Employees: Do you have an employee handbook? If so, does your handbook address the following policies: At-will employment policy, nondiscrimination policy, sexual harassment policy and confidential information policy? If your business has…

Read More

It’s Election Time. Give Employees Time Off to Vote

By Employment Law

According to Georgia Code 21-2-404, employers must allow up to two hours of time off for employees to vote within any municipal, county, state or federal political party primary or election where they are qualified and registered to vote. Employers are not required to provide paid time off. In the instance where polls are open for two consecutive hours before or after the employee’s work shift, time off does not need to be granted. Learn…

Read More

For Tip Credit, Employers Must be Transparent with Employees

By Employment Law, Payroll

Employers with employees who receive part of their compensation in the form of tips must provide oral or written notice to their employees that they are taking a tip credit. With the understanding that most tipped employees make up the difference of the minimum wage of $7.25/hour through tips, employers are allowed to use the “tip credit” to pay employees $2.13/hour. An employer who fails to provide the required information to their employee cannot use…

Read More

New Georgia Lactation Law Requires Paid Breaks

By Employment Law, Employment News, Uncategorized

Georgia passed HB 1090 on August 5, 2020, which requires employers to provide reasonable break time to working mothers who desire to express breast milk at their worksite during working hours. The new law also requires employers to provide working mothers with a private location, other than a restroom, where they can express milk. And in contrast to existing Federal Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), it requires that the lactation breaks be paid at the…

Read More

Get Your Signs Ready: Complying with the Georgia COVID-19 Pandemic Business Safety Act (GCPBSA)

By Employment Law, Employment News, News, Workers' Compensation, Workplace Injuries

Earlier this summer the Georgia legislature came together in support of businesses to craft much-demanded legislation to protect business owners from the liability associated with claims that customers and employees contracted COVID-19 in their place of business. The Georgia COVID-19 Pandemic Business Safety Act (GCPBSA) went into effect last Friday, August 7, and expands upon language originally extended to healthcare professionals and healthcare facilities. Protection is now provided for nearly all public, private, sacred or…

Read More

Obtaining Credit for EPSLA and EFMLEA

By Employment Law, FMLA, Sick Leave

On April 1, 2020, the U.S. DOL enacted a temporary rule operational through the EOY that provides direction for administration of the Emergency Paid Sick Leave Act (EPSLA) and the Emergency Family and Medical Leave Expansion Act (EFMLEA). With schools opening this month we anticipate more employers having questions about obtaining credits related specifically to EPSLA (due to contagion) and EFMLEA (due to school closings). Please know that in instances where claims are made for…

Read More

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website.