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Employment Law

Vaccine Mandate Looms for Employers

By COVID-19, Employment Law, Employment News, OSHA Regulations, Vaccine Mandates

Under the federal vaccine mandate announced by the Biden administration, many large employers will be required to have their workers vaccinated or subject to weekly COVID-19 testing. The current deadline for compliance is January 4, but the situation is a moving target. On Saturday, November 6, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 5th Circuit halted the requirements pending their review. Republican attorneys general in at least 26 states have challenged President Biden’s vaccine and…

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Vaccine Mandates Go into Effect for Certain Health Care Workers

By Employment Law, Employment News, Vaccine Mandates

In conjunction with the federal vaccine mandate announced for employers with 100 employees or more, the Biden Administration has announced that employees of health care facilities that participate in Medicare and Medicaid must be vaccinated against COVID-19. The emergency regulation issued by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) is intended to protect health care workers on the front lines of fighting the virus from getting the virus themselves, while also providing assurances to…

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Federal Contractors Subject to Latest Vaccine Mandate

By Employment Law, Employment News, Vaccine Mandates

Along with the federal vaccine mandate announced by the Biden Administration for employers with 100 employees or more, the White House has announced that federal contractors will now fall under the same requirements. Previously, the administration announced vaccine requirements for federal contractors and subcontractors in September. According to the latest Fact Sheet, federal contractors may have some workplaces subject to the requirements for federal contractors and other workplaces subject to the newly-released COVID-19 Vaccination and…

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How can an employer be prepared for accident reporting?

By Employment Law, Employment News, OSHA Regulations, Risk Management & Safety

Each February 1 through April 30, employers are required to display OSHA Form 300A, which is a summary of the injuries and illnesses recorded the previous year. If there are multiple locations, a business is required to complete a Form 300 and 300A for each physical establishment. Form 300A should be posted in a visible location where employees can view accident totals for their specific workplace site. Both Form 300 and Form 301 must be…

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Expansion of COBRA Requires Updated Notices

By Employment Law

With the expansion of COBRA eligibility under ARPA comes a requirement for updated information to be posted in your office along with all other mandatory notices as well and distributed to all individuals who may no longer be in your employment but are eligible for the benefit and subsidy. While the provision went into effect on April 1, the legislation allows federal agencies 30-45 days to provide model notices. Rest assured that once notices are…

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ARPA Provides 100% Employer Credit, Expands COBRA Enrollment Rights

By Employment Law, Employment News

Beginning April 1, 2021 and continuing through September 30, 2021, group health plans providing COBRA continuation coverage are required to offer a 100% subsidy of COBRA premiums for individuals eligible for COBRA due to involuntary termination or reduction in hours. The premium subsidy is advanced by the employer and is not taxable to the former employee. Employers will be reimbursed via a refundable credit against their Medicare payroll tax liability. Individuals without a COBRA election…

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When Do School Closures Qualify for EFLMEA

By Employment Law, FMLA

With another round of school closures prominent in local media, employees who are not able to work from home may be turning to their employers to inquire about their eligibility for paid leave. As we mentioned in an earlier article, requirements outlined in the Emergency Family Medical Leave Expansion Act (EFMLEA) expired December 31 with FCCRA but for employers who voluntarily offer benefits through March 31, there is still a tax deduction available. Why you…

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How the Consolidated Appropriations Act Changed EPSL and EFLMA for 2021

By Employment Law, FMLA, Sick Leave

Although most of the benefits associated with Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) passed last March expired on December 31, 2020, many of the COVID-19 related issues it was created to address still exist. Employers should note that when the Consolidated Appropriations Act (CAA) was passed on December 27, 2020, it did not extend the employers’ obligation to provide employees with emergency paid sick leave or emergency family and medical leave, but it did extend…

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Protect Your Business from HR Pitfalls with Our Checklist for 2021

By Best Practices, Employment Law, Hiring, Policies and Procedures, Record-keeping, Recordkeeping

A smart way to start the fiscal year is to incorporate a self-evaluation of your organization’s compliance with state and federal labor laws. This simple checklist should serve as a great starting point. A few basic areas of exploration should include: For Current Employees: Do you have an employee handbook? If so, does your handbook address the following policies: At-will employment policy, nondiscrimination policy, sexual harassment policy and confidential information policy? If your business has…

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It’s Election Time. Give Employees Time Off to Vote

By Employment Law

According to Georgia Code 21-2-404, employers must allow up to two hours of time off for employees to vote within any municipal, county, state or federal political party primary or election where they are qualified and registered to vote. Employers are not required to provide paid time off. In the instance where polls are open for two consecutive hours before or after the employee’s work shift, time off does not need to be granted. Learn…

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